Tag Archives: Canada

[Video] Stunning Views from Moraine Lake, Banff National Park

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Happy Wednesday!

I’m just checking in to inform you that I’ve published a new video on my YouTube channel, and if you read my last Photo Friday, you’ll find that this clip is essentially the video version of the picture I showcased in that post.

I just felt I had to share some more of those stunning views from Moraine Lake in beautiful Banff National Park.

Check it out below and enjoy!


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*This blog was originally posted on seekingsaudades.com*

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Moraine Lake, Banff National Park – Photo Friday #17

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Welcome back to Photo Friday!

Earlier this month, I had the absolute pleasure of visiting one of the most beautiful places in the world: Moraine Lake, located in stunning Banff National Park, Alberta.

This visit was part of a cross-Canada road trip that spanned 9-days, 5 provinces, 7100 kilometres, and 75 hours worth of driving from my home province of Ontario to British Columbia. Looking back on this photo, and others from my time in the country’s oldest national Park, it’s still hard to believe that this was a real place.

The mountains seemed like they were CGI’d into the background, the water looked as though it was scooped up and delivered straight from the Bahamas, and the trees seemed to go on for eternity. I was only able to spend 24-hours in Banff before having to turn around and begin the long drive home, but it was worth every single second and penny that it took to get there…

…including the $1,300 emergency brake job I had to get in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, but that’s a story for another time.

See you next week!

Moraine Lake, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada
Moraine Lake, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada (ca. Sept. 2021)

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Algonquin Park Moose Encounter – Photo Friday #16

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Welcome back to Photo Friday!

This week, I’m sharing a video I took of one of the many (46 thus far!) moose encounters I’ve had in Algonquin Provincial Park this summer.

Taken in June 2021, I was lucky enough to have spotted a cow and her calf munching on some leaves for a midday snack. From where I was standing, the moose couldn’t have been more than 25 feet away, one of the closest encounters I’ve had to date.

Of course, moose can be extremely dangerous, especially if they feel threatened or are protecting their young. However, I was calmed by knowing that this particular mother had been raising her calves in the busy campgrounds of Algonquin Park for years, and had become relatively unbothered by humans in her presence.

While they may seen like elusive animals, spotting a moose in Algonquin Park is far easier than it may seem. I’ve encountered upwards of 70 in the past 2 summers! If you’re looking to see some moose of your own, be sure to keep an eye out for my Algonquin Park moose spotting guide here in the near future!


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Track and Tower Trail, Algonquin Park – Photo Friday #15

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Welcome back to Photo Friday!

This week’s picture was taken at the lookout on the Track and Tower Trail, located in Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada last month in June 2021.

The longest hike I’ve done this year, and certainly the most interesting, the Track and Tower Trail had a wide variety of historical stops, wooded paths, river crossings, and scenic lookouts. Keep an eye out for a full trail report here on seekingsaudades.com in the coming future.

In un-related news, I’ve finally received my second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, which means I’m fully vaccinated, Canada is closer to completely reopening, and international travel isn’t too far away either.

Exciting times ahead!

Track and Tower Trail, Algonquin Park, Ontario, Canada
Track and Tower Trail, Algonquin Park, Ontario, Canada (ca. June 2021)

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The Kayak’s Maiden Voyage (Evoke Algonquin Kayak Review)

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Earlier this year, my parents and I split the cost of a new kayak, something we’ve been thinking of purchasing for a few years now. We bought it from our local Canadian Tire for around CAD $999. After accessorizing paddles, roof mounts, and other various items the final total was bumped up towards CAD $1200. We decided on the Evoke Algonquin 12-ft. *Edit: Be sure to read to the end for a 6-month update*

We’ve had a canoe up at the lake for years, but it’s extremely heavy, hard to maneuver, and a pain to take out for longer trips. After spending a significant amount of time in Algonquin Provincial Park last year, I aspired to find more time to spend outdoors, and so I felt it was finally time to bite the bullet and look for a boat that could both be used at the cottage for a good workout, and something that could potentially be taken out into the backcountry on weekend portage camping trips. Seeing as most new lightweight canoes will set you back upwards of CAD $5000, the next best option for us was to look for a kayak which could check off the same wish list as a canoe, but at a more reasonable price, resulting in the purchase of the Evoke Algonquin 12-ft.

Fast forward to this past weekend, and the water was finally warm enough (46 ℉) to feel confident that I could attempt to take it out for a spin without risking death if I fell overboard. I had been in a kayak once before at my buddy Alex’s cottage, and I came pretty close to going for an unwanted swim several times, so I was skeptical about my chances of staying dry this time around.

evoke 12 ft kayak

In the end, the new kayak proved to be extremely roomy, stable, and tracked in the water like a dream. It took some thinking, but I was also able to get in and out of the kayak pretty easy. It’s still a bit of a heavier boat at 56 pounds, but I didn’t really feel it during the paddle, and it was easy enough to carry. Some of the features include an adjustable seat and foot rests, 2 storage compartments, 2 rod holders, and a removable front dash. I’m yet to try and stash any overnight gear in it yet, but it looks like there’s plenty of room for some potential camping trips later this summer. (Update: it was a little tight and took some thinking, but I was able to fit several days worth of gear into the boat with limited effect on comfort and manuverability)

evoke 12 ft kayak

The total length of the maiden voyage ended up being around 4 km, and took about an hour, the most of which was used up getting a feel for paddling, fiddling with things, and stopping to take some pictures. After about a week straight of rain, it turned out to be a calm, warm, and overall really nice day for a trip out on to the lake.

evoke 12 ft kayak
evoke 12 ft kayak
evoke 12 ft kayak

Despite being 10 days into May, the tree’s have yet to show their leaves. I didn’t take a picture of it, but there was actually a large pile of snow and ice still holding on for dear life a little ways back into the forest. I figure there’s still another week or so until the leaves start to appear, and while it looks dreary at the moment, it means that the blackflies and mosquitos are still yet to arrive, so it’s not all bad.

evoke 12 ft kayak

Overall, the kayak’s maiden voyage turned out to be a great success, and I’ve got big plans for it in the coming months, most of which involve Algonquin Park in some respect. However, before I do that I figure the kayak should have a name, because you know, all proper boats do.

So if you’ve got a suggestion for a name, or have any questions about the kayak itself, let me know in the comments below!


*6 Month Update*:

In my opinions, the Algonquin Evoke 12-ft kayak has turned out to be a very good purchase, and I recommend it if your in the market for a kayak. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment! Here’s a quick summary of the boat’s pros and cons thus far:

Pros:

  • I still find it easy to carry and transport
  • It withstood an entire summer of admittedly pretty rough use with only a few scratches
  • The color held up flawlessly despite being in the sun 24/7
  • It tracks very well in the water and feels incredibly stable, even under light chop
  • Enough storage for overnight camping trips
  • The centre-console is fantastic
  • The hull rarely warped, but quickly bounced back when it did
  • The seat is fairly comfortable and never became an issue while paddling

Cons:

  • The adhesive/glue on the knee padding started to peel on very hot days, but I was able to get it to restick
  • The seat-back adjustment is very weak and will fold under pressure if fully extended. You’re best to either keep it at the lowest position or brace it with something to remedy this.

Thank you for reading! If you’ve made it this far please consider liking the post, sharing it with your friends, and hitting the follow button so you don’t miss any of my upcoming material! If you’re looking to connect, make sure to follow me on YouTube, InstagramFacebookTwitter, and Pinterest!

*This blog was originally posted on seekingsaudades.com*

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Canadian Sunset Timelapse – Photo Friday #12

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Welcome back to Photo Video Friday!

I was finally able to make it out to the lake last weekend, thanks to the ice going out earlier than expected. This means a whole bunch of good things, most notable of which is the ability to sit on the dock with a piping hot coffee to watch the sun as it sets below the horizon.

Long before I started this blog, or even made seekingsaudades.com, I created a YouTube channel with the intent of one day posting travel videos. Until now, I’ve never uploaded anything, instead choosing to focus on creating content here. I figured I needed to get the YouTube train rolling at some point, and so today I decided to do just that.

Luckily, time-lapses are technically photos, so I can shamelessly promote my YouTube channel here and still have it loosely connect to the blog. This particular time-lapse was taken on April 17, 2020 in Algonquin Highlands, Ontario.

I would greatly appreciate it if you considered subscribing to my YouTube channel once you’re finished watching the video. While I don’t have any immediate plans to post a bunch of content, I will be making an effort this summer to try and put together some videos of whatever travels I end up doing.

Thanks for all of your support, and see you next week!


Thank you for reading! If you’ve made it this far please consider liking the post, sharing it with your friends, and hitting the follow button so you don’t miss any of my upcoming material! If you’re looking to connect, make sure to follow me on YouTube, InstagramFacebookTwitter, and Pinterest!

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The Top 5 Ontario Travel Destinations in 2021

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For most, 2021 is shaping up to be a really great year to explore what’s in your own backyard. The Province of Ontario has so much to offer, which makes it hard to narrow down the list of things to see and do, and so to help, I put together a shortlist of my top 5 Ontario travel destinations to consider in 2021.

Tl;dr: Manitoulin Island, Sleeping Giant Provincial Park, Pickle Lake, Algonquin Provincial Park, Niagara Falls.


1. Manitoulin Island

In my opinion, Manitoulin Island is one of the most underrated destinations in all of Ontario. I visited Manitoulin Island last year and fell in love with the place almost instantly. Surrounded by Lake Huron, dotted with a number of lakes, and covered by dense forests, the natural beauty of this place is just stunning. I recommend taking the time to hike the Cup & Saucer Trail, which offers a number of lookouts over the island, and navigates a northern section of the Niagara Escarpment.

Aside from the natural beauty, Manitoulin Island is home to around 14,000 people, a good portion of whom belong to the many thriving Indigenous communities on the island. This means if you’re looking to learn more about Indigenous history and culture, Manitoulin Island is the place to be.

To get here, you can take the ferry across from Tobermory, or drive along the north shore of Georgian Bay, west of Sudbury. If you’re doing the latter, I recommend staying at Chutes Provincial Park to break up the trip.

Cup and Saucer Trail, Manitoulin Island. The Top 5 Ontario Travel Destinations in 2021.
Cup & Saucer Trail, Manitoulin Island
2. Sleeping Giant Provincial Park

Sleeping Giant Provincial Park offers some of the most iconic views in the entire province. Located an hour outside Thunder Bay, along the north shore of Lake Superior, Sleeping Giant Provincial Park is one of those destinations I think the majority of Ontarians never get around to seeing, mainly due to its sheer distance from the southern portion of the province.

Sleeping Giant Provincial Park offers over 100 kilometres of hiking trails, car-camping, excellent wildlife viewing opportunities, and of course a number of stunning lookouts and views you just can’t find anywhere else. If you’re willing to make the almost 15-hour drive from Toronto, you won’t be disappointed with what you find here.

Sleeping Giant//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

(Photo Source: Ontario Parks on Flickr)

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3. Pickle Lake

Pickle Lake is my one obligatory oddball destination on this list, and somewhere most people probably haven’t heard of. It’s also one of those places that’s more about the journey to get there, than the destination itself.

See, Pickle Lake is… kind of in the middle of nowhere. It has a population of less than 400 people, and is a staggering 22-hour drive, and 2,000 kilometres away from Toronto. So why would I include this as one of the top 5 destinations in 2021? Well as it turns out, Pickle Lake lies at the end of the northernmost point of the Ontario provincial highway system.

I might be alone on this one, but I just can’t help but think how cool it would be to say that you’ve driven to the most northern drivable point in Ontario. You might want to think about bringing an extra jerry can though.

4. Algonquin Provincial Park

Alright, back to reality with this one.

Algonquin Provincial Park is the oldest provincial park in Canada, and one of the largest in the province as well, covering a staggering 7,600 squared kilometres. The best part? It’s only a 3-hour drive from Toronto; great for those looking to escape for the day or weekend.

Algonquin Park offers activities for everyone, and for all ages. Car camping, backcountry camping, hiking, fishing, guided tours, historical sites, and more. If you’re looking for it, chances are Algonquin Park offers it, which no doubt contributes to it being one of the most visited and popular provincial parks in Ontario, year after year.

If you’re interested in learning more about what Algonquin Park has to offer, make sure to check out some of my Algonquin guides here.

Spruce Bog Boardwalk Trail, Algonquin Provincial Park. The Top 5 Ontario Travel Destinations in 2021.
Spruce Bog Boardwalk Trail, Algonquin Park
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5. Niagara Falls

Now, I know what you’re thinking with this one: “Niagara Falls? Wow, how original…”

But hear me out, when’s the last time you actually went to Niagara Falls? Those of us who are within driving distance of Niagara Falls tend to take for granted just how lucky we are to live so close to one of the most awe-inspiring natural wonders in the world, something people travel from all over the world to come see. Most of the people I’ve met in my life have been to Niagara Falls at least once, but can’t remember when they went, or who they went with last. Just because you’ve been there before, doesn’t mean it’s not worth going again, especially when it comes to Niagara Falls. It could even make for a good Tim’s Run destination!

I mean, it sure beats sitting on the couch, right?

The Top 5 Ontario Travel Destinations in 2021.
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
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What locations would you add to this list? Where are you looking forward to visiting the most this year? Let me know in the comments below!


Thank you for reading! If you’ve made it this far please consider liking the post, sharing it with your friends, and hitting the follow button so you don’t miss any of my upcoming material! If you’re looking to connect, make sure to follow me on InstagramFacebookTwitter, and Pinterest!

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The First Signs of Spring – Photo Friday #10

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Welcome back to Photo Friday!

It’s finally April, and the first signs of spring are starting to appear in Central Ontario. This image, taken in the Algonquin Highlands, Canada on April 2, 2021 shows that the temperature is rising, the snows are melting, and the lakes are finally thawing. Although it will more than likely be a few weeks until the lakes are fully open, its nice to see the water appearing along the shoreline and the ice retreating.

I’m definitely looking forward to getting back out here once university is all wrapped up for the term, and to do more exploring this summer. Warmer, sunnier days are just around the corner, and more posts documenting them will be sure to follow.

See you next week!

Algonquin Highlands, Ontario, Canada (ca. April 2021)

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Toronto Raptors NBA Championship Parade – Photo Friday #9

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Welcome back to Photo Friday!

This week’s photo was taken in Downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada during the Toronto Raptors’ 2019 NBA Championship Parade.

There’s a lot I can say about this day: the sheer number of people, the complete disorganization, the 5-hour time delay, the heatwave. In a city that had been so starved for a winning team in one of North America’s “big four” leagues (NBA, NHL, NFL, MLB), we sure did go all in for the celebration. Some estimates have some 1.5 million plus people taking part in at least some of the festivities that day, and in a city that only has a population of around 3 million.

I have a ton of pictures and stories I can show and tell from my experience at the Raptors’ Championship Parade, so I’ll write a separate post that goes into further detail sometime in the near future. For now, here’s a little sneak peek.

See you next week!

Toronto Raptors Championship Parade, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Toronto Raptors Championship Parade, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (ca. June 2019)

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An Impulse Road Trip to the Province of Québec (Isle-aux-Allumettes)

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Back in August of 2020, I woke up one morning and decided I was up for an adventure.

I had just spent the night in Ontario’s Algonquin Provincial Park, where I had been working for the past couple months for a summer job. My shift on this particular day started at 1:15 p.m., so I had some time to kill on my hands. I thought about hiking one of the park’s many hiking trails, but the trails I still had left to do were either too short, or too long. Seeing as I didn’t really feel like waiting around for half a day before work, or showing up hours late, I decided to steer my gaze elsewhere.

See, except for Whitney, Ontario, which lies just outside Algonquin’s borders, I had never really ventured past the Park’s East Gate. And so, I set my initial sights on Barry’s Bay, and hit the road just after 7:30 a.m. When I got there, I filled up on gas, and grabbed a coffee. With still so much time left before work, I checked Google Maps to see where else I could go.

This is when I noticed my relative proximity to the Province of Québec. From Barry’s Bay, it was only a 1-hour, 93 km drive. I checked the clock and calculated that I would have just enough time to get there, turn around, make the 2-hour return drive, and get back to Algonquin just before work started. I only had a small window of time to get moving, and so without hesitating, I got in my car and headed towards the border.

Now, if you’ve ever been to this portion of Ontario, you’ll know the struggle that is the radio. My only two choices were CBC talk radio, or the local country station. I chose the country station as the lesser of two evils. I could have listened to my own playlists, but I was in one of those weird phases where you skip every song that comes on.

Thankfully, the radio wasn’t that important as the scenery was just absolutely stunning. The topography ranged from lakes, rocks, and forests, to large rolling hills, to open fields of farmland, and then back to forests again. The best way to describe it would be if the length of southern Ontario from Windsor to Sudbury was compressed into a 1-hour drive.

Naturally, due to the time crunch, I didn’t stop to take many pictures on the way there. It was only when I got to the Ontario-Québec border that I decided I should make an attempt to document the trip, and that is where the following photo’s pick up.

Crossing the bridge from Pembroke, Ontario to L’Isle-aux-Allumettes, Québec.
Bienvenue au Québec! Entering Canada’s French Speaking Province.
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When I got across the bridge, and onto the Isle-aux-Allumettes, my only real plan was to find somewhere to pull off the road and see the Ottawa River. I ended up turning down a series of random roads that I figured led towards the water. After about 10 minutes of searching, I found a boat launch, parked my car, and got out to take a look.

I took a bunch of pictures, and sent them to my family group chat and a few friends with the message: “Bienvenue au Québec”. I kept waiting for them to be surprised that I had somehow magically appeared in another province on the same day that I was supposed to be working, but those messages never came. When I asked about why nobody responded to me a few days later, I was told that nobody actually clued in to the fact that I was actually in Québec. They figured that I had just sent them some random pictures from the internet, or that I was just trying practice my French. I had to show them my phone’s camera roll before anyone finally believed me!

L'Isle-aux-Allumettes, Quebec, Canada
My first impression of the Ottawa River was it’s sheer size. It felt more like a lake than a river!
L'Isle-aux-Allumettes, Quebec, Canada
There was a long pier that jetted out into the middle of the river, as well as a small lighthouse close to the water.
L'Isle-aux-Allumettes, Quebec, Canada
Turning to look back towards the shore, there was a small barn, and some riverfront homes peering out from the trees.
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L'Isle-aux-Allumettes, Quebec, Canada
Looking across the river, you could see the skyline of Pembroke, Ontario.
L'Isle-aux-Allumettes, Quebec, Canada
Along with the lighthouse, there was a boat launch at the end of the pier.
L'Isle-aux-Allumettes, Quebec, Canada
(You might have seen this picture on Photo Friday)

By the time I got to the end of the Pier, it was time to turn around and head back to Algonquin Provincial Park for work. I drove 2 and a half hours straight back, bobbing my head along to the sounds of my new found forced-love of country music. It was close, but I managed to arrive about 10 minutes before the start of my shift.

In hindsight, this impulse trip was quite possibly the dumbest thing I could have chosen to do that day. I could have easily been late for work, and my legs were absolutely dead from all the driving; not exactly helpful when you’re job requires you to be on your feet for 8-hours straight.

However, at the same time it was the best thing I could have done because when I think back to 2020, this trip to Québec was one of the more memorable parts of the summer. In a year when there wasn’t much travelling going on, this was a welcomed change of pace and a brief return to some sense of normalcy.

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Thank you so much for reading, and if you’ve made it this far please consider liking the post, sharing it with your friends, and hitting the follow button so you don’t miss any of my upcoming material! And don’t forget to follow me on InstagramFacebookTwitter, and Pinterest!

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